Quantcast

Neil deGrasse Tyson Slams Science Deniers for 'Dismantling of Our informed Democracy'

Neil deGrasse Tyson has an urgent message for Americans, especially for some of our most powerful politicians.

In a video posted April 19 on his Facebook page, which already has more than 16 million views, the famed astrophysicist warns that science denial could ultimately destroy democracy.

Alongside the video post, Tyson wrote:

"Dear Facebook Universe, I offer this four-minute video on 'Science in America' containing what may be the most important words I have ever spoken. As always, but especially these days, keep looking up."

The video shows how the U.S. rose from—as Tyson calls it— a "backwoods country" to "one of the greatest nations the world has ever known" because of science.

"But in this, the 21st century, when it comes time to make decisions about science, it seems to me that people have lost the ability to judge what is true and what is not," he laments.

"When you have an established scientific emergent truth it is true, whether or not you believe in it," he says. "And the sooner you understand that, the faster we can get on with the political conversations about how to solve the problems that face us."

The video then shows debates on heated scientific topics, including GMOs, climate change and vaccines, as well as a clip of Vice President Mike Pence, then a congressman, saying on the House floor, "Let us demand that educators around America teach evolution not as fact, but as theory."

Tyson says this shift in attitudes is a "recipe for the complete dismantling of our informed democracy."

Watch the video here:

Keep reading... Show less

Watch Neil deGrasse Tyson Tell Colbert How's He's Dealing With a Climate Denier Running the EPA

By Alexandra Rosenmann

American astrophysicist, celebrated author and director of the Hayden Planetarium at New York's Natural History Museum, Neil deGrasse Tyson, joined Stephen Colbert on Tuesday night. DeGrasse Tyson weighed in on claims made by Trump's new U.S. Environmental Protection Agency head.

Scott Pruitt "said he does not believe CO2 is the control knob for climate change," Colbert reminded his guest. "What is the present consensus of CO2 and climate change?"

"It's a greenhouse gas," deGrasse Tyson answered.

"People just talk," he continued. "I can't chase what people say because it flutters with the breeze."

DeGrasse Tyson warned that if Pruitt "puts down some legislation that requires that everyone [must go along with his beliefs], oh! Oh, my God! Hold me back!" he exclaimed.

"I'll hold you back," Colbert offered. "He's going to blow," he told the audience. "He's a crystal geyser!"

Watch here:

Reposted with permission from our media associate AlterNet.

Sponsored

Bill Nye Calls Kyrie Irving's Flat Earth Theory 'Heartbreaking'

Last year, astrophysicist Neil deGrasse Tyson feuded with rapper B.o.B. over his belief that the world is flat. About a year later, Tyson's friend and science educator Bill Nye is contesting professional basketball player Kyrie Irving's own "Flat Earth" claims.

It all started when the Cleveland Cavaliers point guard appeared on a recent "Road Trippin' with RJ and Channing" podcast hosted by teammates Richard Jefferson and Channing Frye and discussed conspiracy theories.

"This is not even a conspiracy. The Earth is flat. The Earth is flat. The Earth is flat," Irving insisted, as USA Today detailed about the Feb. 17 show.

"For what I've known for as many years and what I've come to believe, what I've been taught, is that the Earth is round," he continued. "But if you really think about it from a landscape of the way we travel, the way we move, and the fact that—can you really think of us rotating around the sun and all planets aligned, rotating in specific dates, being perpendicular with what's going on with these planets?"

He seemed to double down on these claims in a later interview with Sports Illustrated. Even when the All Star athlete was asked if he's seen photos of our round Blue Marble, Irving responded, "I've seen a lot of things that my education system said was real that turned out to be completely fake."

But "The Science Guy" wasn't having any of it.

"It's really concerning when you have people in the public eye—or people in general—who think the Earth might not be round," Nye told Sports Illustrated. "It's really an extraordinary thing."

He remarked that a host of scientific technologies depend on our very round planet.

"We have spacecrafts, we all depend on weather reports. We've got mobile phones, we're talking on electric computer machines right now," Nye said. "So to have people that eschew or don't accept or don't embrace this method, this process that brought us all this remarkable technology ... all this is through this process of science."

"And so it's heartbreaking when we have people that even joke about it," he concluded.

Nye's dose of science fact is especially necessary during these fraught times. As any EcoWatch reader knows, many people who control the U.S. government are about as anti-science as it gets.

Luckily, Nye will soon make his long-awaited return to our screens with his new Netflix show, Bill Nye Saves the World, which has a premiere date of April 21.

Each episode will explore some of the most complex scientific topics of the day, from climate change, vaccines and genetically modified organisms (GMOs). Nye and his band of correspondents aim to bust myths and refute anti-scientific claims that may be espoused by politicians, religious leaders or titans of industry, according to its IMBD description.

Irving's Flat Earth beliefs have been lighting up news outlets and social media this week. However, he seems to have since slightly backtracked on his position.

In the video below, Irving appears around the 1:45 mark saying that Earth being flat is "scientifically impossible" and that the media has politicized his beliefs.

Sponsored
Sponsored

mail-copy

Get EcoWatch in your inbox