Danielle Trofe is a Brooklyn-based designer who creates pendant and table lamps that are made from mushroom mycelium. She grows the lampshades inside custom 3D-printed molds and treats them with natural dyes.

Danielle Trofe grows lampshades inside custom 3D-printed molds and treats them with natural dyes. Photo credit: Danielle Trofe

"Mycelium is basically the root structure of mushrooms," Trofe explained in the Mashable video below. "It's rapidly regenerative. It's basically nature's glue."

She takes crop waste—a mixture of corn stalks and seed husks—and injects it with the liquid mushroom mycelium. This "mulch-like material" is then placed in the mold, where it takes four to seven days to grow. After it's done growing, Trofe simply lets it dry, heats it and then dies it.

The product is so natural that Trofe said you could even eat it, though she doesn't recommend it. "It wouldn't taste good at all," she said. "But that's what we were trying to achieve here. Something so natural you could eat it."

Watch the video here:

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